The ALR3000 is the sister machine to the ALR4000 and primarily focuses on processing LCD TVs. This development of the series saw the integration of robotics to the system to achieve an increased process rate of 1 LCDs processed every minute and a reduction in the footprint of the machine.

Introduction to ALR3000

How it works?

Partners of the EC ReVolv Project developing the ALR3000 technology at the kick off meeting 2015, Plassey House, University of Limerick, Ireland.

The technology was developed under European Commissions Eco-innovation programme by Votechnik (project: www.ReVolvproject.eu ) and a multi- stakeholder partnership. Votechniks partners and collaborators included the WEEE Forum (International compliance scheme and stakeholder platform for waste electronics), University of Limerick, and KMK Metal Recycling. ALR3000 machine is in live operation with Ireland’s national recycler KMK Metals Recycling since 2018 processing Ireland waste LCDs.

Meet KMK:

CASE STUDY
How it’s used by KMK

Kurt and Edeltraud Kyck founded KMK in 1979 to trade metal. From garage start up to one of Ireland’s home grown largest recyclers separating metal from over 40,000 tonnes of electronics per year in their state of art facilities spanning more then 3 hectares and employing over 110 people. The company is a family run business with the next generation now leading the way in day to day operations. KMK are processing large volumes of waste electronics ~40,000 tonnes. 1500 tonnes of this is waste LCDs which is time consuming to manually disassembly to remove the hazardous components. The separation and removal of the components that contain these toxic substances prevents direct shredding of the LCDs.  

Therefore the processing options become extremely limited for these 1500 tonnes. KMKs options were manual disassembly or to export the LCDs to a specialist handler in the EU incurring processing and transportation fees. The solution to this as been the ALR3000 technology. The ALR3000 has added tremendous value to the KMK Metals Recycling processing capabilities, allowing them to process their LCDs in-house, save on exportation costs, and derive additional revenue from the separated fractions. 

ALR2000

The ALR2000 was the second series of development of the LCD recycling technologies under taken by Votechnik. The focus in this series was taking the machine from batch processing for individual LCD sizes to sequential processing for the different sizes. This series of developments also enclosed the entire machine with a built in carbon filtration system to capture any emission and ensure that machine was safe to be around.

The ALR2000 had a linear process flow where the LCDs were moved from one station to another for processing and removal of the CCFL tubes and liquid crystal panels. The machine used a mechanical conveying system to transfer the LCD through the process allowing more time saving and a higher processing rate.
Please see animation illustrating the ALR2000 machine process and operation.

ALR2000 Technical Specification

ALR2000

Throughput

45 LCD/hour

Set up

Sequential

Variation acceptance success rate

~80%

Hg Reading

0 reading

<OEL 20 microgram/m3

(TWA-8hours)

Containment areas

Entire unit contained

Pre-processing

Stands removed

Insitue operations

CCFL crushing and storage

Members of the Industrial Advisory board for the EPA project developing the ALR1000 (WEEE Ireland, KMK Metals Recycling, EPA, Department of the Environment, University of Limerick), 2010, Schrodinger Building, University of Limerick.

ALR1000

A machine is born…

Under the leadership of Dr. Lisa O’Donoghue at the University of Limerick, a highly qualified team of postdoctoral researchers undertook the build of the first proof of concept machine the ALR1000 for LCD recycling. The research was commissioned and funded by the Environmental Protection Agency of Ireland, whose remit is to safe guard the Irish environment and implement the EU WEEE legislation at national level. The purpose of the machine was to depollute the LCDs of the CCFL tubes, which contain toxic mercury and the liquid crystal panel.

The team at the University of Limerick under took time motion studies of the disassembly of various flat panel displays and liquid crystal displays. They catalogued the variations in the different displays and looked for similarities of structure and configuration. Identifying this, they then developed a process to quickly access the components containing the toxic materials.

The process involved key incisions in the displays at critical points to release the components of interest.
The team then went to the laboratory where the first of its kind prototype was invented. The image inset shows the prototype as housed in the department of Design, Manufacturing and Technology at the University of Limerick in their automation laboratory.

The machine while rudimentary in design was ground breaking in that it validated the process – processing LCDs in batch mode set up for particular LCD sizes. The machine successfully proved that LCDs can be depolluted and recycled at high speed processing at a rate just over 1 LCD every minute and half.
Upon the success of this, the intellectual property was filed for international patent while the research team published key findings of the research studies in the Journal for Cleaner Production.

ALR1000 patents

International Patent EP2512699B1
Publication

Journal of Cleaner Production,
Volume 19, Issues 9–10, June–July 2011, Pages 1066-1071, Characterising
components of liquid crystal
displays to facilitate disassembly

https://www.sciencedirect.com

ALR1000 Technical Specification

ALR1000

Throughput

36LCD/hour

Set up

Batch

Variation acceptance success rate

~90%

Hg Reading

0 reading

<OEL 20 microgram/m3

(TWA-8hours)

Containment areas

Hg station only

Pre-processing

Stands removed

Insitue operations

CCFL crushing

Got a question? We are here to answer it.

Address

Limerick, South West, Ireland

Phone

+ 353 61 74 8 2 00